“PRS is a brand that truly cares about the quality of every instrument that leaves their hands. That kind of care and attention is invaluable, and really shines through in just how amazing their instruments sound. Whether you're playing music for a living, or for just for fun, it's important to have a reliable and great sounding instrument, and that's what you get out of PRS every time.”

– Aaron Pauley

5 Minutes With Aaron Pauley

PRS: How did you start playing music/bass? How old were you?

AP: I was 8 years old when I got my first guitar, and probably 10 or 11 when I played my first bass. I was always so drawn to music and musicians even at a young age, and I loved watching concerts on TV with my parents. The first thing I ever told my parents that I wanted to be when I grew up was Madonna’s drummer. I was three years old haha!

PRS: Who were some of your biggest musical influences?

AP: As a child, I loved classic rock, funk, and old singer-songwriters. When I was young, it was Hall & Oates, Queen, Earth Wind and Fire, Led Zeppelin, Jim Croce, Ohio Players, Simon and Garfunkel to name a few. When I was in high school, it was Tool, A Perfect Circle, Deftones, Pressure 4-5, Papa Roach. The heavier and more melodic side of rock. It was then I discovered how much I crave raw emotion in music. I love when music takes you places, emotionally.

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PRS: How would you describe yourself stylistically?

AP: My role as a bass player is really to reinforce the beat and movement in the song, and to ultimately determine the melodic direction of the song. Being a singer as well, I often write counter melodies to my vocal melodies on the bass, which yields some pretty cool results sometimes.

PRS: Do you have a warm-up routine before going on stage?

AP: I warm up my voice for 20-30 minutes before set. I also stretch my hands and fingers, and do light cardio to get the heart going.

Of Mice and Men on stage

PRS: How would you describe yourself stylistically?

AP: My role as a bass player is really to reinforce the beat and movement in the song, and to ultimately determine the melodic direction of the song. Being a singer as well, I often write counter melodies to my vocal melodies on the bass, which yields some pretty cool results sometimes.

PRS: Do you have a warm-up routine before going on stage?

AP: I warm up my voice for 20-30 minutes before set. I also stretch my hands and fingers, and do light cardio to get the heart going.

aaron pauley